Movie Review: Frozen II

credit: Ralph Breaks the Internet

Way back in 2013, Frozen made its debut in cinemas worldwide, causing a lot of people to fall in love with the movie or, at least, experience the Last Song Syndrome with its most famous song, Let It Go. Successful movies typically had that one song that, when heard outside of its movie, people would associate with the movie. For example, Titanic had My Heart Will Go On, and Mulan had Reflection.

Through the song Let It Go, the movie was not forgotten. It was kept alive in the minds of those who had witnessed the film. It was even kept alive for those who had not seen the movie! Mentioning or singing Let It Go was enough remembrance for most of us.

So when Disney announced a sequel for the hit film, the fans were ecstatic to see how would the story of our well-loved princesses turned out. It was around six years since we had seen Anna and Elsa (unless you have seen Wreck-It Ralph 2), so we hope it was worth the wait.

Below, we will analyze the plot of Frozen II to determine if it was worth watching. By the way, the movie also had a hit song, Into the Unknown.

credit: Frozen II

A movie about a war between people

That was the vibe that the movie gave to me when I first watched it, and it stuck too well. The movie opens with King Agnarr telling the story to his children of how their grandfather allied with a neighboring tribe through the construction of a dam in the forest. After that, the movie showed how mankind could sometimes threaten nature, and nature would just defend itself.

First, a war broke out between Agnarr’s kingdom, Arendelle, and that neighboring kingdom (its name is Northuldra). The Arendellians and the Northuldrans had their differences, causing them to grow distant from one another. Peace seemed to be achieved after the completion of the dam. However, the dam had blood in its history.

In Ahtohallan, Elsa discovered its grim backstory. It appeared that King Runeard, their grandfather who was behind the creation of the dam, wanted to invade Northuldra and annex it so that his kingdom would grow bigger. However, he could not do it, as the Northuldrans had magical abilities that could disperse their armies supernaturally. The dam was built to deprive Northuldrans of their resources so that invading them would be easy. He also stepped closer to his plan by killing the previous ruler of Northumbria.

This just showed how humans could fight each other without declaring war. Sometimes, conflict is derived even without a formal declaration of war. In the movie, conflict is stirred up by King Runeard’s greedy desires. The movie wanted to say that it was the greedy desire of some that could put the lives of others in jeopardy. Imagine your whole village dying because of a dam just because of one man’s desires.

credit: Frozen II

The movie was about a war against nature as well

The film also highlighted the fact that nature can be destroyed for man’s benefit or even be used, if not destroyed, in his favor. In the movie, the dam, or water, was used as a weapon of war by Runeard to the Northuldrans, thirsting for their resources. It only went to show that nature wasn’t always necessarily destroyed, as it could also become the mean for destruction, and in this movie, a destruction of a kingdom that a bad king wanted to subjugate.

Destruction of nature, or the use of it for destruction, also harms the balance in the environment. The movie gave visual representations of it, rather than just directly showing the effects like how we have it in real life. In the movie, several monsters were introduced, five elemental spirits to be exact, to represent the five elements. After the war, all those elemental spirits got angry with mankind and froze their kingdoms.

In real life, there would be no elemental spirits that would get mad over humanity’s actions. However, nature had its way of revenge. As humans tried to use air to poison their enemies, the air became toxic for most of us. As humans struggle to control water, some countries receive too much water (floods) or too little (drought) to the extremes.

Overall, the movie is great with its messages.

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